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Let’s go back to the future and make cinema more accessible for deaf people Let’s go back to the future and make cinema more accessible for deaf people Let’s go back to the future and make cinema more accessible for deaf people

The game is changing for the way blind people see the world

Football is known as the beautiful game.

And you can’t deny the beauty in the way deafblind football fan Jose Richard Gallego follows matches live with the help of his friend.

The 35-year-old Columbian who supports Barcelona has Usher’s syndrome, which means he has hearing loss and sight loss, particularly the loss of his peripheral vision.

But with the help of his friend and interpreter, Cesar Daza, Jose follows the action during football matches through a system of signs they created together.

A whole new world

The pair use a wooden board to represent the pitch and Jose holds onto Cesar’s hands as he recreates what is happening on the pitch so that Jose can follow the game through touch.

They also speak to each other using a sign language they made themselves to describe the action.

How amazing is that?

Here’s a short video of Jose and Cesar live in action at a recent match between Barcelona and Girona at Barcelona’s Nou Camp Stadium.

Watch it if you can, it’s an inspiring sight.

Lend me your eyes

The Be My Eyes app is another great example of how people with sight loss are being helped to translate the world around them.

The brilliant free app connects blind and low vision people with sighted volunteers for visual assistance via a live video call.

So whenever a blind or low vision person needs visual assistance with everyday tasks they can use the app to connect to a sighted volunteer.

The volunteer can then relay information about everything from expiry dates on groceries to the colour of clothes or the phone number on a leaflet.

The app is an example of how the digital revolution is changing our world. And it’s something that would have seen unimaginable in the last century – less than 20 years ago!

Need help to make your communications accessible and inclusive to comply with The Equality Act 2010 and attract new customers? Contact us now.